Author Archives: Michael Bear

USAF brat, grew up abroad, now live and work in San Diego.

–Science Diving Editor at California Diver Magazine

–AAUS Science Diver

–PADI Master Diver with over 1000 cold-water dives in California

Global Underwater Explorers LA: Great White Encounter

Filed under Oceans

Too Close for Comfort. A Great Wonderful Summer (GWS) experience from Cyrille R on Vimeo.

Kyle McBurnie: 1st Hammerhead Entered Into Ocean Sanctuaries’ ‘Sharks of San Diego’

Filed under Sharks

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Charles Lofton: Baby Horn Shark: First To Be Entered Into National Geographic’s ‘Fieldscope’ Tool

Filed under Oceans

Used with Permission

[Used with Permission]       http://oceansanctuaries.org/wordpress/citizen-science-projects/fieldscope/

 

Underwater Film by Erick Higuera: ‘Baja’

Filed under Oceans

BAJA from Erick Higuera on Vimeo.

Ocean Sanctuaries: The Sharks of San Diego

Filed under Oceans

Coming Soon at Ocean Sanctuaries.org: ‘The Sharks of San Diego.’

Already consider yourself a veteran of logging Sevengill shark encounters?

Would you like a chance to log encounters with *other* species of shark?

Soon you will have a chance with National Geographic’s latest citizen science tool called: Fieldscope. You will be able to log sightings and photos of Leopard sharks, Horn sharks, Angel sharks, Tope sharks as well as pelagic species such as Blue, Mako, Great White and Thresher.

 

Credit: Michael Bear

Credit: Michael Bear

Lazaro Ruda: Male Seahorse Giving Birth

Filed under Oceans

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(Used with permission)

Michael Bear: Lion Nudibranch Spreading Its Hood to Feed

Filed under Nudibranch

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Gayle Van Leer: Mysterious Jelly-like Creature at La Jolla Shores

Filed under Jellyfish

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A Remarkable Video by WeiWei Gao: 2 Octopuses Fighting

Filed under Oceans

Wrestling Octopus at the Shores from Weiwei Gao on Vimeo.

National Geographic Documentary [Full Length]: The Sharks of Pitcairn Island

Filed under Oceans

Due to its remoteness, this is one of the few areas in the world where the shark population is healthy.